BITX40 QRP Transceiver

The BITX40 is an interesting project. It is an inexpensive ($59) QRP 40 meter band SSB (LSB only) transceiver that comes as a semi-preassembled kit. The main boards are built and tested by the manufacturer in India and the end user only has to mount the boards in a case and wire the power, controls, and antenna connections. The radio itself is controlled by an Arduino microcontroller using a version of the Raduino firmware and a digital synthesizer chip provides frequency stability. Due to its simple design it is easily modified and there are dozens of mods on the internet that can be performed to add features. My ham radio club did a group build project of this radio and we had over 20 members put together their own BITX40.

One of the most convenient features of this kit is that the main boards make use of connectors to simplify construction. This also makes the radio very easy to disassemble since nearly all of the wiring can be unplugged. The kit comes with all the parts you need (other than a case, speaker, and knobs), however, I made a few changes. I had a couple of 6mm shaft knobs that I wanted to use that did not fit the potentiometers that were supplied. I also wanted to implement a couple of the simplest and most useful mods. I ordered the following parts from Mouser:

The pushbuttons are useful due to the features added in the modified Raduino firmware. With the new firmware installed, the white pushbutton serves as a Menu button that provides access to the additional features included in the firmware (Multiple VFOs, RIT, Split, USB, CW, frequency calibration, scanning features, and many others). One of the interesting things about the firmware is that if you have it installed and do not add any buttons or other mods, it still behaves like the default firmware. Only when you perform the appropriate mods does the additional functionality become accessible.

Another mod I performed allows the red pushbutton to serve as a Tune button. When pressed the radio automatically switches to CW mode, keys the transmitter, and generates a tone to allow tuneup of an antenna tuner. This functionality actually requires 3 separate mods (PTT Sense, CW Carrier, and TX-RX) which are detailed in the updated firmware’s documentation. They involve soldering a couple of resistors to specific locations on the board as well as a transistor across the PTT line and wiring from these components to the Arduino’s IO points. In order to maintain my ability to easily disassemble the radio by removing the case’s front and rear panels, I used a 2 pin header to create my own connectors for plugging and unplugging some of the additional wires that were added for these mods. The final modification involved soldering a 100pF capacitor in parallel with the inductor L7. This helps suppress the 2nd harmonic to levels that are acceptable to the FCC.

For the speaker I drilled some holes in the top of the case to let the sound out and mounted the speaker.  I left the wires long so that it is easy to remove the top of the case and lay it to the side without having to unplug the speaker cable from the main board. Using a speaker is highly recommended for this radio instead of using headphones. This is due to the fact that the BITX40 has no AGC (although there are mods to add one) and consequently the audio from strong stations is drastically louder than weaker ones. This difference in volume could easily hurt your ears if you were wearing headphones.

An electret microphone element is provided with the kit and I wired it up with a pushbutton in a small enclosure to work as a hand mic. I secured the mic element and the shielded cable using hot glue. This arrangement required me to wire the mic and PTT lines to the same 1/8″ stereo jack on the front panel, even though they have separate connections to the main board. As basic as this setup is it functions well and I have had good audio reports on the contacts I have made using it.

The best word to describe using the BITX40 is funky. After years of using modern complex transceivers, the BITX is almost shocking for how simple it is. You tune around and adjust the volume, that’s about it. Nevertheless it works, as long as you abide by QRP operating procedure:  find the strongest station on the band and weight for them to call CQ or QRZ. It’s pretty impressive how simple this radio is and how little you really need to make contacts.

I put a fair amount of effort to construct this radio carefully, however, some of my ham club’s members who built their own ended up with a spaghetti of wires and their radios still functioned fine. Because all of the complex circuitry is pre-assembled and tested, the hardest part of this project is already done. That is a key part to this being a great project because it allows people of all skill levels to build something and be virtually guaranteed that at the end they will have a working radio. In my club we had people who had never soldered before build this radio (with plenty of guidance) and they were all smiles when we powered up their creation the first time. The combination of affordability and functionality make the BITX40 an amazing piece of technology and a fantastic addition to ham radio.

Ham Radio EMCOMM Go Kit – Version 2

Last year I put together both VHF/UHF and HF go kits. While functional, neither of these was as capable or robust as I ultimately wanted my go kit to be. My new goal was to build an all-in-one station in a box that was not overly bulky or heavy.

Design

If you look around the internet you will see a lot of people building go kits in rack cases. I always liked the sturdiness and modularity of this type of case, but not the bulk. Most builders us a full size 6 unit case, which is not compact (roughly 24″ square and 13″ tall) nor lightweight (over 18lbs). After evaluating the equipment I planned to use in the kit I realized that I did not need a full depth case. Using a shallow case saves me 8″ of depth and cuts the weight as well. I laid out several possible equipment arrangements in CAD and found that if I kept the kit fairly barebones (no SWR meters or external antenna tuners, only one external speaker) I could also move from a 6 unit case to a 4 unit and still fit everything I needed. The 4 unit shallow case I used is 22.4″ x 16.2″ x 9.1″ and weighs 12.8lbs.

The general design philosophy for this project was to have all of the equipment mounted to two shelves (one on the bottom and one at the top). After my experiments in CAD I found that a good organizational layout was achieved with the power supply, power distribution, and HF transceiver mounted on the bottom. As part of the power distribution system I wanted to incorporate an automatic backup power switch. This allows the power system to seamlessly change from AC wall/generator power to battery power. While not necessary, this is a nice feature to have because it prevents your radio from turning off while operating if there is an interruption of power (which can easily happen in emergency and field operations).

This left the VHF/UHF transceiver, speaker, and two SignaLinks for the top shelf. The SignaLinks are separated by the speaker to easily differentiate which unit is connected to which radio. I went with multiple digital interfaces because while I will most likely never be transmitting on both V/U and HF simultaneously, it can be very handy to be able to monitor both at the same time or to monitor one while transmitting on the other. Having two units also allows me to never worry about changing radio and SignaLink wiring to operate on the band I need to.

In order to simplify the cabling between the SignaLinks and my laptop I decided to us a powered USB hub and to make the USB hub accessible on the back of the case. This makes it very convenient when in the field since I don’t have to reach into the case to plug in the interface cables. The addition of a rear mounting plate gave me a place to pull out the V/U transceiver’s antenna connection for easier access as well.

I decided one external speaker would be adequate based on the layout I settled on. In this layout there is a fair amount of space below the V/U radio’s speaker to allow for sufficient sound output. The HF radio, however, has much less space above its top mounted speaker. Another consideration I made was that FM audio on V/U is generally very clean, especially compared to SSB audio on HF. Based on this I chose to use the speaker with the HF radio.

Parts

Construction

The Powerwerx power supply is perfect for go kits. It is very compact (6″ x 5″ x 2″), has convenient Anderson powerpole connections on the front (in addition to terminals on the back), and can be secured with mounting brackets.

The Yaesu 450D offers a lot of bang-for-your-buck and is relatively compact and lightweight as well (9lbs). The built-in automatic antenna tuner does not have the widest range (3:1), but I don’t plan to use it with non-resonant antennas so it should be more than adequate. Making use of the internal tuner also allowed me to eliminate an external tuner from the design, which was one of the key reasons I was able to fit everything inside a 4 unit case. The 450D was mounted using 2.5″ steel brackets along with M4 machine screws and 1/8″ nylon spacers to prevent the brackets from rubbing against the radio’s enclosure. I had originally intended to use Yaesu’s mobile mount for the 450D, however, it took up too much space and would have affected my layout. This arrangement lifts the radio about 1/2″ off of the shelf which should provide plenty of ventilation.

In the preliminary layouts I had planned to use a West Mountain Radio PWRgate and Rigrunner for backup power switching and power distribution. This plan proved impractical due to space restrictions, however, I found the perfect substitution in the Low Loss PWRgate. It is about half the size of the other backup power switch and it provides 3 output powerpoles which eliminates the need for a Rigrunner or other distribution block. While the LLPG is rated for 25 amps vs the 40 amps of the other unit, this should still be adequate for my purposes. The LLPG is very lightweight and was mounted using heavy duty double stick tape.

The Kenwood V71A was mounted using it’s mobile mounting bracket. The voltage converter for the USB hub was screwed to the shelf using its mounting tabs. The other equipment on the upper shelf was mounted using either heavy duty velcro (SignaLinks, USB hub) or double stick tape (speaker). I also added some rubber strips to the bottom of the speaker because I found in test fittings that the clearance between the speaker and the HF radio was only about 1/8″ and I didn’t want any inadvertent contact between them when the case is moved.

Cable Management

Part of eliminating the Rigrunner from my build meant that I had to provide some protection for the power wiring and radios. This was done using inline fuse holders with ATC style fuses. I also had a fair amount of radio interface and USB cables to manage. The shelves I chose are vented which makes them perfect for using wire ties to secure everything in place. I also wanted to make the go kit as straightforward as possible to assemble and disassemble. Part of this goal was limiting the wire tying of cables to individual shelves. This means that if I want to remove a shelf, I only need to disconnect the handful of cables that are connected between the two shelves (two power, one speaker audio, one SignaLink), then unscrew the shelf and pull it out. No cutting of wire ties is necessary.

I really wanted to be able to stow the radio microphones inside the go kit and I found that I could velcro the V/U radio’s mic to one of the HF radio’s mounting brackets and the microphone’s cable would then fit nicely between the power supply and HF radio. This is especially convenient since the microphone jack is in a position that makes disconnecting it a bit of a pain.

The HF radio’s mic is stowed using velcro and a strap to the inside of the front case lid. The lid has enough depth that the mic can fit without contacting the front of the power supply. The power supply AC power cord is stowed using a similar strap method as the HF mic, except it is in the rear case lid.

Weight

Part of the goal of using a smaller rack case was to cut down on weight as well as bulk. I had estimated that I could build the go kit and keep the weight around 35lbs. In the end the kit weighs 40.5lbs. I think the lesson I took from this is that wire and mounting hardware add up to more weight than you might realize.

Operation

The kit is very straightforward to setup. Once the lids are off I simply unstrap the microphones and power cord. Then I can either plug in AC power or a battery, hook up my antennas, connect USB to my laptop, and I’m on the air. I am very happy with how little bulk this kit has; with the lids removed the case is only 12″ deep and easily fits on a small table. The kit is small enough to integrate perfectly into my home station, which makes it very convenient to make sure everything is fully functional for field operations. I am very pleased with how this kit turned out and I learned a lot of along the way, especially about case layout and parts fitment.

Update – Microphone Connector (February 2017)

After using my Go Kit for a few weeks I realized that the Kenwood V71’s microphone connector was not in the best location. It is on the side of the radio and when the mic is being used it twists and otherwise stresses the microphone’s connector. To improve this situation I decided to extend the radio’s mic connection to the front of the Go Kit. I accomplished this using a 1 foot ethernet patch cable and a RJ45 Inline Coupler. The coupler was mounted on the top of the power supply with heavy duty double stick tape. This new arrangement makes the microphone connection much more accessible and greatly reduces the stress on the connectors.

Update – Integration with New Power Box (November 2017)

Part of building my new Power Box involved modifying the power circuitry for my go kit. Because the battery switching components are now off board I no longer needed the Low Loss PWRgate. In its place I installed a Powerwerx PD-4 distribution block. I also used a powerpole mounting clamp and a piece of ABS plastic to create a mount for the output of my power supply. This gives me two solid points of connection from which I can wire to my power box. Or if I am running exclusively off of the power supply I can use a simple jumper for self contained operation.

QRP Go Kit

After assembling a solid set of QRP gear this year I wanted to put everything into an easy to transport package. To house and protect the kit I used a Monoprice 13″ x 12″ x 6″ Weatherproof Hard Case. This case is the perfect size to fit my mcHF transceiver, and Elecraft T1 autotuner, along with a 3″ external speaker, hand microphone, and power cable. All together the case and equipment weigh a little under 7.5lbs.

With this kit, all I need is 12VDC power and an antenna and I am on-the-air. This should pair perfectly with a small battery and either my random wire or end fed half wave antennas that I built recently.

Update (March 2017)

After completing my mcHF’s new case I decided to update my QRP go kit accordingly. Since the new case has an internal speaker I was able to eliminate the external speaker from the kit. In its place I put a 6Ah Lithium-Iron-Phosphate battery. This should give me between 6 and 12 hours of runtime at 5 Watts output, depending on how much I transmit and what mode I am using. While more expensive than sealed lead acid batteries, LiFEPO4 batteries are lighter in weight, smaller in size, provide more usable amp-hours, and last many more charge-recharge cycles. This 6Ah model weighs about 1.75lbs, compared to 5lbs for a 7Ah sealed lead acid that actually provides less usable power. This iteration of the kit weighs a little under 9lbs, over 3lbs less than the previous version (including the lead acid battery) and it is more compact as well.

Ham Radio EMCOMM Go Kit – HF

HF Kit (1)After some thought I decided that I wanted to treat this as more of a HF Field Kit than a true Go Kit. I had heard good things about the Yaesu FT-450D and after seeing sale prices and mail-in rebates drop the price to $600 I decided to buy one. The Yaesu (9”W x 3.3”H x 8.5”D, 8.8 lbs) is not as compact as some HF rigs, but it is nowhere near as unwieldy as my Kenwood TS-590SG  (10.6″W × 3.8″H × 11.5″D, 16.3 lbs) which serves as my main HF transceiver in my station. For such a compact radio it contains many comparable features to my larger and considerably more expensive Kenwood.

Features

The Yaesu 450D is an entry level transceiver, however, it includes a lot of features that give you considerable bang for your buck.

  • HF/6M Coverage
  • 100W Transmitter
  • IF DSP Filtering (Width, Shift, Contour, Notch, Noise Reduction, etc.)
  • Backlit Buttons (perfect for field use at night)
  • Voice Keyer (perfect for contesting and Field Day)
  • Built-in Antenna Tuner

Field Case

HF Kit (2)To house the Yaesu I used a Monoprice 22″ x 14″ x 8″ Weatherproof Hard Case. This should keep the radio, SignaLink, and microphone secure. Less damage prone items like the power cable can be transported in my backpack. For additional capability I decided to add a second case to the kit.

Accessory Case

This case is the same model used to house the Yaesu 450D. In this case it contains my Manual Antenna Tuner, a MFJ 4125P 22A switching power supply, and a MFJ 822 cross-needle SWR Meter. This case greatly expands the capabilities of my HF kit. The manual tuner has a much wider tuning range than the autotuner inside the 450D, the switching power supply allows me to power the radio from line or generator power if available, and the small SWR meter is perfect for station monitoring in the field.

When line or generator power is not available I will rely on my Go Kit Battery Box. I think that this setup will prove to be versatile and the Yaesu 450D provides many modern conveniences as well as 100W output in a compact package.

mcHF SDR Transceiver Kit

A huge part of the history of ham radio involves people building their own equipment. In fact that is how things started since at the beginnings of radio no commercial hardware was available. Over the years various companies and organizations have sold transceiver kits, but in recent years most of these have consisted of basic morse code only or single frequency single side band devices intended for digital communications. With the increased development of software defined radio (SDR), however, this is changing. Earlier this year I came across the mcHF SDR transceiver project and decided to purchase one of the kits. Unlike other basic transceiver kits the mcHF is a full featured radio with 80M-10M coverage, multi-mode support, variable bandwidth filtering, DSP (noise reduction, notch filtering, etc.), sound card interface, rig control, and band scope / waterfall capability. Not bad for a $388 kit.

mcHF (1)mcHF (2)The project was originated by Chris, M0NKA in the UK about 2 years ago and the design has gone through a number of revisions resulting in the current v0.5, which is what I purchased. One of the major reasons I was willing to undertake this project was that the kit offered by Chris includes the circuit boards already populated with about 95% of the surface-mount parts, including all of the tricky to solder chips and super tiny resistors and capacitors. The only remaining parts to install are larger, and therefore easier to solder, surface-mount parts and standard through-hole components. The builder also has to hand wind several toroid inductors and transformers. You also have to provide your own final power amplifier MOSFETs, shielding plate between the boards, and case for the radio. These requirements go along with the way this kit is sold, which is to say bare bones. The kit includes zero instructions. The builder is responsible for sorting through the mcHF downloads page, the mcHF Yahoo group, and the Github Wiki to find the details regarding how to wind the toroids and transformers as well as details on any recommended mods and instructions for how to use the radio.

Since this project is open source, both the hardware and firmware have undergone considerable development. In fact, from the time I started building the board to when when I completed the project a large firmware update was released which revised the main screen and menu layout as well as added a number of fixes and features, including the ability to control the transceiver via the USB port and detect the transceiver as a sound card device with a PC.

mcHF (3)The mcHF consists of two circuit boards called the UI board and the RF board. I built the UI board first, and then built the power supply section of the RF board so that I could power up and test the UI board. Chris has a very helpful document on the mcHF webpage that steps through the process of installing the bootloader and uploading firmware to the CPU on the UI board. So after only about 4 hours of work I had a functional UI board.

mcHF (7)Next I completed the remainder of the RF board, which was fairly time consuming since winding toroids and transformers is a tedious operation. Documentation exists for how to wind the transformers, however, the only information regarding the toroids is on the RF board schematic which details how many windings each core requires. Extra attention should be paid to stripping the enamel wire used for the toroids and transformers. Even though I diligently sanded off the outer coating and thought that I had solid solder connections to the board, I did not do a good enough job on two of the toroids which prevented the radio’s operation on the 80M band. After desoldering and re-sanding the wires I achieved a good electrical connection and consequently 80M functionality.

mcHF (10)mcHF (11)This portion of kit construction is somewhat confusing because there are a ton of possible mods for the various transformers that can improve performance of the final power amplifier. I decided to build mine in the default configuration which results in a solid 5W output on 80M-12M and about 4W on 10M. When modified, users report 10 or more watts of power output. The only modification I made was with regard to the SWR bridge where RG-178 coax is used in place of a single winding of enamel wire. Construction details for many of these mods are available in a document on the Yahoo group produced by Clint, KA7OEI who has done considerable work on both the hardware and software of the mcHF.

Although not technically a mod, I did add a resistor that is regarded as “optional” on the UI board schematic. This resistor provides power for when an electret microphone is used. Since I would be modifying an Icom HM-36 I had lying around to work with the mcHF, I needed to install this resistor in order for the microphone to function. For this I used a standard 1/4W resistor since I had on of the correct value in my junk box and just soldered it to the surface mount pads. In order to avoid shorting with nearby components I carefully shaped the resistor’s leads and used electrical tape to insulate between the parts.

mcHF (5)mcHF (6)After completing construction of the boards, I turned my attention to completing the radio as a whole. The first step of this was to construct the shield plate between the boards. For this I used a thin mcHF (12)sheet of aluminum that I hand cut, drilled and nibbled according to a pattern available on the mcHF website. I then test fit and assembled the board and shield sandwich to check for proper clearance. When I was satisfied I completed the assembly using 5mm standoffs.

mcHF (19)mcHF (17)If you look around the web you will see a lot of people who have built the mcHF using the same case. This case is sold by Artur, SP3OSJ from Poland for about $63. If you email him at asnieg@epf.pl he will give you the details for how to order. The case comes with all of the knobs and buttons as well as a small piece of acrylic to protect the LCD display. The front panel is pre-machined, however, the endplates are left to the builder to complete. I also had to file some of the button holes to allow smooth operation and I had to sand the acrylic to fit the opening in the case.

mcHF (8)mcHF (9)Since the case serves as the heatsink for the power supply circuitry as well as the final amplifier transistors, a good mechanical connection between the components and the case is necessary. To mcHF (13)mcHF (14)accomplish this I soldered brass #4-40 nuts to the heatsink fin on power supply and amplifier components. I then drilled holes in the case to match where these nuts line up when the case is mcHF (15)assembled. When bolts are inserted and tightened, the electrical components are pulled tight to the wall of the case. In order to achieve a properly aligned connection, I had to grind away a small amount of material where the final amp transistors contact the case (note the hole I drilled in the wrong location due to my inability to follow the old rule of measure twice drill once). The last step in construction was labeling the buttons and ports, which I did using vinyl self-adhesive labels and my laser printer.

The final adjustment before testing the transmitter involves setting the proper bias for the final amplifier and then setting the transmitter gain for each band of operation. Documentation for these adjustments is on the Github Wiki. Basically you set the bias in one of the mcHF’s menu settings while keying the transmitter with no audio present as you watch the current draw of the radio. The transmitter gain is also a menu setting. These adjustments can be accomplished with an ammeter and a RF power meter.

mcHF (16)Finally, after about 20 hours of work I put my mcHF on the air. After adjusting my microphone gain I made a contact on 40M SSB. I then plugged the transceiver into my PC and fired up WJST-X. Following the guide on the Github Wiki I was able to get rig control working and made a half dozen contacts using JT65 on the 30M band using nothing but the mcHF and my laptop. The next day I checked into my local 10M SSB net and received good signal and audio reports from the other regulars who are familiar with my voice.

Overall I have to say that I am incredibly happy with the mcHF kit. It has been a great learning experience and the radio itself is an incredibly capable and configurable device that offers a lot of bang for your buck. I plan to use the mcHF quite a bit in the future and look forward to any future firmware updates. I also hope that this kit leads to other similar kits in the future that can help get more hams back to building equipment.

I highly recommend this kit for anyone with some electronics experience. While the documentation has not been collected into one easily digestible package, the kit itself is actually very straightforward to put together and I was able to get it on the air with only a cheap multi-meter and an RF power meter. It is also an incredible bargain for such full featured radio; I spent under $500 total for the kit, case and other ancillary parts (not including the microphone) which is not bad at all when you compare this to what is available commercially.

 

 

 

Ham Radio EMCOMM Go Kit – VHF/UHF

VHF Go Kit (7)Recently myself and others in my ham radio club have been getting more involved in emergency communications (EMCOMM) training and activities. As part of this effort to be better prepared for emergencies I decided to build a go kit or “station in a box” that could be used as a portable communications system.

VHF Go Kit (2)VHF Go Kit (1)Since VHF and UHF are the most used bands for EMCOMM I started with that. I already had a Kenwood TM-V71a dual band (2 Meter and 70cm) transceiver which is an ideal radio for this application. At full power it can output 50 watts and unlike many transceivers of this kind it features a data port on the back for easy connection to an external sound card (I use the SignaLink USB) for digital communications. It also has a detachable faceplate which allows for a lot of flexibility regarding where and how the transceiver body is mounted.

To house the electronics I chose the Monoprice 14″ x 16″ x 8″ weatherproof hard case which is similar to Pelican cases at a fraction of the price.

VHF Go Kit (4)VHF Go Kit (3)For power, I chose to include a 10 amp switching power supply in the go kit. I used the Astron SS-12 since its dimensions were such that it fit perfectly in the case when mounted next to the transceiver. In case 120V is not available, I can simply unplug the transceiver’s powerpole connection from the power supply and plug it into my battery box.

In order to mount all of the equipment in the case I built a base of 1/2″ plywood. The base consists of a single sheet cut to fit in the case glued on top of a four 1/2″ spacer blocks which raise the sheet above the bottom of the case. This serves two purposes:  first it negates the need to round the bottom edges of the sheet to match the curve of the case and second it doubles the thickness of wood that the mounting screws have to grip when screwed in through the bottom of the case. An added bonus of raising the sheet is that it provides space to store excess cable from the faceplate separation kit in an out of the way location.

VHF Go Kit (6)VHF Go Kit (9)Mounting the transceiver to the plywood is done using the mobile mounting bracket for the radio. The power supply is mounted by removing the rubber feet from the bottom of the power supply and replacing them with spacers and screws for a strong connection to the plywood. The microphone mount is also simply screwed to the plywood. The faceplate is mounted to the lid of the case using the separation kit mount which uses very strong double stick tape. The SignaLink is mounted to the top of the power supply using industrial strength velcro which allows for easy removal of the unit if I want to use it in a different configuration while holding it very secure when I want to leave it in the case.

VHF Go Kit (5)Before I mounted anything to the plywood I applied a coat of clear polyurethane. This not only makes the oak veneer look a lot better, it also seals the wood and provides some protection. The equipment was then mounted to the board and it was mounted in the case using 4 wood screws driven through the bottom of the case. In order to help restore the weatherproofing of the case I used silicone caulking to seal around the screw heads.

Overall I am very pleased with how this go kit turned out. To get on the air all I have to do is open the case, hook up power (either 120V or 12V), hook up the coax to the antenna and plug in the USB cable to my laptop if I need to run digital. In all it’s a very capable VHF/UHF station that weighs about 17 lbs and isn’t much bigger than a shoe box.

Shortwave Regenerative Receiver

regen2regen1This project is a great way for beginning builders to hone their skills at circuit construction. The receiver plans were originally printed in a September 2000 article in QST. I built mine from scratch, not on a printed circuit board, with no ill effects due to strange parts placement. The author provides very good advice about the audio/volume and regeneration controls placement and hookup (by being careful, no shielded audio cables are necessary). Since I used a large value tuning capacitor from my junk box, I added the optional fine tuning control to add better selectivity to my receiver, which is very helpful when tuning. By following the author’s recommendations about how to assemble the receiver the average builder should have no problems with this project. When in doubt, the provided voltages on the schematic are a handy way to test your completed project.